Starbucks vs ethiopia

Branding The high profile dispute with Starbucks increased the popularity of Ethiopian coffee. BEAN BATTLE Ethiopia The country, one of the poorest in the world, wants to trademark the names of three coffee-growing regions to force companies that sell its beans to sign licensing agreements and to gain higher prices for its produce.

Setting up a certification system would have been impracticable and too expensive. Trademarks for Ethiopian coffees are also registered in the European Union and Canada. Using trademark registrations, the government of Ethiopia could then produce greater quantities of specialty coffees from all over the country.

The Coffee War: Ethiopia and the Starbucks Story

The Ethiopian government had to make a decision on how to best use IPRs to obtain exclusive ownership of Ethiopian coffee names, achieve wider international recognition and maximize returns.

Jamaican Blue Mountain and Kona coffees have geographic certifications. Instead, Starbucks argues, Ethiopia would be better served by another form of protection, called geographic certification, used for such products as Idaho potatoes, Roquefort cheese and Florida oranges.

The Coffee War: Ethiopia and the Starbucks Story

Specialty coffee in Ethiopia is grown on over four million small plots of land by an estimatedindependent farmers spread throughout the country in remote areas.

It gives the holder the exclusive right to use the name in branding, but it doesn't place any requirements on the product. This was seen as a more direct route of protection because it would grant the government of Ethiopia the legal right to exploit, license and use the trademarked names in relation to coffee goods to the exclusion of all other traders.

But the EIPO and its advisors disagreed. Freshness — Once you have opened the bag of coffee, Starbucks recommends grinding coffee fresh and using it within a week. The licensing strategy is expected to boost consumer recognition of Ethiopian coffee trademarks and facilitate the growth of the demand for Ethiopian fine coffees.

Starbucks vs. Ethiopia

To blunt some of the opposition, Ethiopia has said it will not ask for royalties for its trademarked beans.

Starbucks, for instance, could still sell Shirkina Sun-Dried Sidamo, as long as its beans came from the region. Sign In Starbucks vs. The Initiative also intended to generate high retail prices for Harrar, Sidamo and Yirgacheffe — the three most famous coffee brands of Ethiopia.

But in the case of Sidamo, Starbucks Charts had got there first, with an application the year before to trademark Shirkina Sun-Dried Sidamo. This strategy gave the Ethiopian government greater and more effective control over the distribution of its product, which ultimately increases revenue by exporting more goods, enabling a rise in prices and benefits to farmers.

A GI also requires that the government oversee producers and distributors to guarantee that the coffees sold belong to a particular style or region, such as Sidamo. It is not related to certification.

Yirgacheffe, Harrar and Sidamo, where Fero is located. Getachew, who like most Ethiopians goes by his given name, argues that if the higher rates were simply the product of investments in roasting, packaging or marketing, distributors could do the same with any coffee.

Today, with more than 25, stores around the globe, Starbucks is the premier roaster and retailer of specialty coffee in the world. Only if that strategy fails, he says, would other options, such as minimum prices, be pursued.

This strategy will ensure that Ethiopian farmers and small businessmen secure a reasonable return from the sale of their coffees. The high cost of legal services for foreign trademark registration created some initial difficulties. But in the case of Sidamo, Starbucks Charts had got there first, with an application the year before to trademark Shirkina Sun-Dried Sidamo.

Instead, Starbucks argues, Ethiopia would be better served by another form of protection, called geographic certification, used for such products as Idaho potatoes, Roquefort cheese and Florida oranges.

Jamaican Blue Mountain and Kona coffees have geographic certifications. It was an attempt to use tools usually reserved for corporations in developed economies to wrest profit from their distributors.

The designations, they argued, referred not to geographical locations but to distinctive coffee types. In Japan, registration certificates have been secured for two of the coffees Yirgacheffe and Sidamo. The conflict began in Marchwhen Ethiopia filed with the U.

Since they don't, he says, some of the extra value must originate where the beans are grown. The conflict began in Marchwhen Ethiopia filed with the U.

Information on the Initiative as well as licensing is made publicly available through a dedicated website. More to the point, certification wouldn't require distributors to seek permission to use the names in their branding. Prior to the IP protection initiative, Ethiopia was receiving a scanty 6 percent of the final retail price for its coffees.

Full-bodied and elegantly complex, every sip of Sun-Dried Ethiopia Sidamo™ is absolutely sumptuous. We love it for its notes of soft pepper, dried dark cherry and chocolate. This coffee is born of a collaboration between Starbucks and Ethiopian coffee farmers that started in The Starbucks Channel.

A place for inspiring, original stories about community, innovation and all things coffee. Learn More». Starbucks vs.

Starbucks vs. Ethiopia : Corporate Strategy and Ethical Sourcing in the Coffee Industry

Ethiopia Corporate Strategy and Ethical Sourcing in the Coffee Industry Donald DePass. 2 janettravellmd.com Introduction In MarchEthiopia filed with the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office to trademark the names of Yirgacheffe, Harrar and Sidamo, three coffee producing regions within the country.

A trademark represents any name, word. Feb 26,  · Starbucks vs.

Starbucks Honors the Birthplace of Coffee with Ethiopia, a New Coffee Steeped in History

Ethiopia The country that gave the world the coffee bean and the company that invented the $4 latte are fighting over a trademark, says Fortune's Stephan Faris.

US coffee chain Starbucks is denying Ethiopia earnings of £47m ($88m) a year, according to Oxfam. The UK charity says Starbucks asked the National Coffee Association (NCA) to block the country's bid to trademark three types of coffee bean in the US.

Starbucks vs. Ethiopia Corporate Strategy and Ethical Sourcing in the Coffee Industry. Case Studies in Ethics 2 janettravellmd.com Introduction In MarchEthiopia fi led with the U.S.

Starbucks Reserve® Sun-Dried Ethiopia Sidamo™

Patent and Trademark Offi ce to trademark the names of Yirgacheffe.

Starbucks vs ethiopia
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